Your life will forever change. A sourdough starter can be the ticket to your kitchen creativity, or it will overwhelm you and you’ll pitch the idea after a month. I would agree more with the first statement. Since sourdough has entered our lives it has been a fun and creative addition to our meals. Mostly my mind is full of ways to use the precious starter without ever throwing any “discard” away.

There is really no limit to what can be made from a starter. Since adopting this baby in January I’ve made sourdough banana bread, cheese danishes, biscuits, chicken and dumpling soup….. It’s really endless.

I’m hoping to put all of these recipes on my page with pictures, but you know. One step at a time. Let’s get you baking first!

You can totally buy a starter and not bother with starting your own. My friend got a starter that began in the 1700’s! The cool thing about older starters is that the flavors are more developed and tangy. Starters grab wild yeast out the air and then you feed it to continue the love process. The more you bake and bake with yeast, the more wild yeast in the air for your starter baby! Cute!

INGREDIENTS:

To Begin:

  • 1 cup flour | 113grams (All purpose/ Whole Wheat/ Rye –> I would choose whole wheat)
  • 1/2 cup water | 113 grams (room temp water or a little warmer if your room is cold)

Second Feed:

  • 1 cup flour | 113grams (All purpose)
  • 1/2 cup water | 113 grams (room temp water or a little warmer if your room is cold)

Continued Feeding:

  • 1 cup flour | 113grams (All purpose)
  • 1/2 cup water | 113 grams (room temp water or a little warmer if your room is cold)

DIRECTIONS:

  1. In a crock/quart mason jar/ container mix your “To Begin” flour and water quantities. Be sure no flour is left dry.
  2. Cover loosely. Let sit for 24 hours.
  3. Your starter may have begun bubbling (it’s alive!). If not, no worries. Discard half of the starter, about 1/2 cup.
  4. Mix in your “Second Feed” quantities of flour and water. Mixing thoroughly.
  5. Cover loosely. Let sit for 24 hours.
  6. By day three you should start to see some bubble action. You may even be getting some tangy sour flavors, yum!
  7. Mix in your “Continued Feeding” quantities. Be sure to mix thoroughly.
  8. Cover loosely. Let sit for 24 hours.
  9. Day 4 the starter will be doubled in size, bubbly, and speaking. Just kidding. It will be very active with yeast and fermentation! Feed your starter the same 1 scant cup of flour and 1/2 cup water. The dough will look like thick pancake batter.
  10. Cover loosely. Let sit for 24 hours.
  11. By day 5 you may be ready to do your first baking! You can build the starter a few more days if you think it needs more time (and if your container can stand it!).
  12. Once you have reached this point there isn’t a need to keep growing the amount of starter. To maintain, discard half of the starter and then feed it with more flour and water.
  13. If you are baking a lot you can keep the starter on the counter and feed daily. Alternatively, you can cover tightly and store it in the fridge and feed once a week. Leave it out at least overnight for fridge feedings so the yeast can become strong.

Enjoy your starter. They are very forgiving and provide such a complex flavor to baked goods that it’s hard to beat!